Art Tribune Interview

Info

IN THE GARIBALDI AREA, THE NEW EXHIBITION SPACE BY GAIA BIANCHI AND ANDREA ZARDIN OPENS WITH A PERSONNEL OF THE ARTIST PIACENTINA BRIGITTA ROSSETTI: BETWEEN INSTALLATION, SCULPTURE AND PAINTING, A THIN DIALOGUE IS CREATED BETWEEN THE MAN AND THE ENVIRONMENT THAT SURROUNDS IT.

The project was born from the commitment of Gaia Bianchi and Andrea Zardin, two young protagonists of the Milanese contemporary scene: thus opens the new Bianchi Zardin Contemporary Art, a gallery that has all the intentions of entering the artistic scene by bringing that little bit more with it. "Not just an exhibition space: the gallery acts as a meeting point for professionals and enthusiasts, with a dense calendar of events open to the public to generate dialogues and artistic contaminations", explain the organizers. "With an eye to the promotion of young talents, both Italian and international, through a large network of collaborations with public and private institutions, in Italy and abroad". The headquarters of the new gallery is located in via Maroncelli, in the Garibaldi area: among the most innovative neighborhoods in Milan, a few steps from the Feltrinelli Foundation.

BIANCHI ZARDIN CONTEMPORARY ART: THE FIRST EXHIBITION

The space is inaugurated by Brigitta Rossetti (Piacenza, 1974), an artist who has always been interested in the practices of reuse in the creation of sculptures and installations, together with a preference for abandoned and recovered objects, raw, organic, industrial and waste materials. At Bianchi Zardin Contemporary Art he brings Peter Pan's boots, an installation created with recycled materials that gives its name to the entire exhibition. A sort of passe-partout for a metaphysical place that represents everyone's introspective space and in which each visitor can recognize a part of himself. The entire exhibition is set up to suggest strong connections with the natural world, also found in the works Lost Spring and The same island before, through which the artist immerses the viewer in a dialogue between natural and artificial elements, a representation in scale reduced by that precarious link between man and nature. As in Incomprenhsibile, a yoke repainted and converted to a new function: its message is to remember that "what seems is not what it is". The human subject, although not depicted, is at the center of Brigitta Rossetti's latest work, called to measure herself against the external environment and overturn her point of view on things.

-Giulia Ronchi

Attachments